Follow-Up Practices of Surgeons and Medical Oncologists in Australia and New Zealand Following Resection of Esophagogastric Cancers

Tim Chew, Tim Bright, Tim Price, David Watson, Peter Devitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Follow-up practices for patients who have undergone surgical resection of esophagogastric malignancies are variable and poorly documented. To better understand practice, a questionnaire was used to survey surgeons and medical oncologists to deter­mine whether any consensus exists. Methods: An opt-in online questionnaire was sent to esophagogastric surgeons and medical oncologists via the membership lists for the Australian and New Zealand Gastric and Oesophageal Surgery Association (ANZGOSA), the Australian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Groups (AGITG), and the Medical Oncology Group of Australia (MOGA). The questionnaire proposed five clinical scenarios and provided a range of follow-up options for each scenario. Clinicians were asked to indicate which best matched their clinical practice. Results: Most clinicians follow patients for at least 3–5 years following resection of gastric or esophageal cancer. In total, 52% perform routine surveillance imaging, with individual scenarios not altering this. Tumor markers are infrequently used. Endoscopy and routine blood tests are used by around half the respondents. Conclusion: There was little consensus about the use of investigations to monitor patients following esophagogastric cancer surgery. Choices do not follow guidelines or evidence. The identified patterns of postoperative surveillance practice appear not to be evidence based, and generally do not match recently published Australian guidelines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-222
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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