Food label education does not reduce sodium intake in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomised controlled trial

Kristina Petersen, David Torpy, Ian Chapman, Sanghamitra Guha, Peter Clifton, Kirsty Turner, Jennifer Keough

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Sodium intake is high in people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim of this study was to investigate whether urinary sodium excretion can be reduced by educating people with T2DM to read food labels and choose low sodium products. Method: In a 3. month randomised controlled trial, 78 men (n=. 49) and women (n=. 29) with T2DM were recruited from a Diabetes Centre at a University teaching hospital. The intervention group was educated in a single session to use the nutrition information panel on food labels to choose products which complied with the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) guideline of <120. mg sodium/100. g food. The control group continued on their usual diet. The primary outcome measure was 24. h urinary sodium excretion which was performed at baseline and 3. months. Data was analysed using repeated measures analysis of variance, independent samples t-test and Pearson's correlations. Results: At 3. months mean urinary sodium excretion was unchanged in the intervention (174. ±. 13. mmol/24. h and 175. ±. 13. mmol/24. h) and control group (167. ±. 15. mmol/24. h and 161. ±. 13. mmol/24. h), and there was no between group difference (p. 0.05). Conclusion: Sodium excretion was not reduced following the label reading education provided to this group of people with T2DM.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)147-151
    Number of pages5
    JournalAppetite
    Volume68
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Food label education does not reduce sodium intake in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomised controlled trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this