From sensory attributes to marketing hooks: Using laddering to understand consumer perceptions of red meat

I. Flight, C. G. Russell, I. Blossfeld, D. N. Cox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Laddering is a practical qualitative method for uncovering consumers' motivations surrounding product choices (the means-end-chain model). Perceptions of attributes, consequences and values attributable to red meat (beef and lamb) were elicited in middle-aged (male 56; female 59) and "young" elderly (male 63; female 61) consumers in one-on-one interviews. Quantitative analysis using abstract categories revealed pictorial representations (hierarchical value maps) of the motivations for consuming red meat specific to the two consumer segments. For example, elderly females perceived lean red meat (attribute) to have the benefit of aiding weight control (physical consequence) which in turn provided a healthy life (psychosocial consequence) with the outcome enjoying life (value). These "ladders" have practical application in the construction of personally relevant promotional messages. Quantification of the strengths of constructs and linkages facilitates identification of new "hooks" or opportunities for potential products.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)418-424
Number of pages7
JournalFood Australia
Volume55
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2003
Externally publishedYes

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