From the Margins to the Centre: Whole-of-Institution Approaches to University-Level Literacy and Language Development in Australia and New Zealand

Karen Orr Vered, Susan Thomas, Lisa Emerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Perhaps more than any other field, writing and literacy instruction holds at its core the powerful distinction that Shirley Rose and Irwin Weiser draw between “knowing that” and “knowing how,” (2002), or the relationship between theoretical knowledge and practical application, as well as Eileen Maimon’s concept of “home campus ethnographers” (2006), since much of this work involves reading people, situations, and institutional policies and responding accordingly. The dappled history of composition in the United States reveals familiar problems of resistance and disciplinary biases that seem to come naturally with the territory of writing and literacy instruction –particularly in ivy league or R1 universities where the legitimacy of such scholarship can be suspect, but policies from national professional organizations and a wealth of such organizations devoted to writing and literacy offer at least some guidance and recourse
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalAcross the Disciplines: interdisciplinary perspectives on language, learning and academic writing
Volume16
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 5 Oct 2019

Bibliographical note

Across the Disciplines is an open-access, peer-review scholarly journal published on the WAC Clearinghouse and supported by Colorado State University and Georgia Southern University. Articles are published under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND license (Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs) ISSN 1554-8244. Copyright © 1997-2019 The WAC Clearinghouse and/or the site’s authors, developers, and contributors. Some material is used with permission.

Keywords

  • writing
  • literacy
  • Australia

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