From war elephants to cheap electronics: modern globalisation has its roots in ancient trade networks

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

Many think of globalisation as a modern and corporate phenomenon, and it has been readily linked to the spread of coronavirus.

But globalisation isn’t new. Archaeological research shows it began in antiquity.

A global economy, with luxury consumerism and global interconnectivity, linked Europe, Africa and Asia at least 5,000 years ago and was widespread 2,000 years ago.

Over the past decade, archaeological excavations of ancient ports of trade have revealed prosperous networks of maritime and terrestrial trade that flourished in the ancient world.
Original languageEnglish
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 6 May 2020

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Keywords

  • History
  • Trade
  • Archeology
  • Ancient history
  • Roman Empire
  • Ancient Egypt
  • Globalisation

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