Further investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men's health research funding is urgently required

Kootsy Canuto, Jacob Prehn, Karla Canuto, Rosie Neate, Graham Gee, Corey Kennedy, Celina Gaweda, Oliver Black, James Smith, Alex Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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Abstract


The burden of disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is 2.3 times that of non-Indigenous Australians, and of that, approximately 70% of the gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians is accounted for by chronic disease.1 For virtually every health marker, including key social and cultural determinants of health, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men fair worst of any population subgroup; they have the highest morbidity rates,2 the highest mortality rates and a current life expectancy 8.6 years less than their non-Indigenous counterparts.3 They are also more likely to be diagnosed with depression or mental illness and be hospitalised for self-harm.2 The Australian government has acknowledged that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men are a priority population in the first National Male Health Policy published in 20104 and the more recent National Men’s Health Strategy 2020–2030.5
Original languageEnglish
Article number100025
Number of pages3
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
  • Indigenous health
  • male health
  • research funding

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