Gangrene, amputation, and allogeneic transplantation in the fifth century AD: A pictorial representation

Antonio Perciaccante, Frank J. Rühli, Francesco M. Galassi, Raffaella Bianucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wet or infected gangrene is necrosis of skin and soft tissue due to a broad category of saprogenic microorganisms (bacteria and fungi).1 It may be characterized clinically by edema, erythema, wound drainage, vesicles or bullae, necrosis, purulent secretions, fever, or pain and shows a rapid progression.2 The treatment is based on antibiotic or antifungal therapy, surgical débridement, and, when needed, amputation. The main risk factors include trauma, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition, obesity, immune depressive states, and postsurgical infections.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)824-825
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • gangrene
  • edema
  • erythema
  • wound drainage
  • necrosis
  • bullae, necrosis
  • antifungal therapy
  • amputation
  • diabetes
  • malnutrition
  • obesity
  • immune depressive
  • postsurgical infections

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