Going beyond students: An association between mixed-hand preference and schizotypy subscales in a general population

Heidi L Chapman, Gina Grimshaw, Michael Nicholls

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Research on the sub-clinical condition of schizotypy suggests that it is associated with mixed handedness. To date, however, this research has focussed on undergraduate populations. If the association between schizotypy and mixed-handedness is the result of an underlying neurological trait, it is important to demonstrate that the effect extends to the general population. With this in mind, 699 participants were drawn from a wide community sample. Schizotypy was measured using the Psychosis Proneness Questionnaire and handedness was assessed using the Annett inventory. To avoid the sometimes arbitrary definitions of left-, right- and mixed-handed, regression analyses were used to explore the data. There was no evidence of a difference in schizotypy between individuals with a left- or right-hand preference. People with a mixed-hand preference, however, had higher scores on PER-MAG (Perceptual Aberration and Magical Ideation) and HYP-IMP (Hypomania and Impulsive Non-Conformity) scales (positive traits). No effect was observed for the SAN (Social Anhedonia) and PAN (Physical Anhedonia) scales (negative traits). The nature of the association between schizotypy and handedness observed in the current study is similar to that reported for student populations. The possibility that the association is related to response biases or a biological mechanism is discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)89-93
    Number of pages5
    JournalPsychiatry Research
    Volume187
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2011

    Keywords

    • Dextral
    • Left
    • Magical ideation
    • Right
    • Schizophrenia
    • Sinistral

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