Has consumer-directed care improved the quality of life of older Australians? An exploratory empirical assessment

Norma B. Bulamu, Billingsley Kaambwa, Liz Gill, Emily Lancsar, Ian D. Cameron, Julie Ratcliffe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the impact of a Consumer Directed Care (CDC) model of service delivery on the quality of life of older people receiving home care packages. Methods: Quality of life was assessed using validated instruments. The relationship between quality of life and length of time exposed to CDC was examined using descriptive statistical and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Consenting older adults (n = 150) in receipt of home care packages participated. Quality of life and capability scores were higher for older people in receipt of a CDC model of service delivery for <12 months compared to those receiving the model of care for longer, although this difference was not statistically significant. However, older people with more recent exposure to CDC indicated a stronger capability to do things that made them feel valued. Conclusion: Extended longitudinal follow-up is needed to facilitate a detailed examination of the relationship between the evolution of CDC and its longer-term influences on quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalAustralasian Journal on Ageing
Early online date4 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 May 2021

Keywords

  • aged
  • aging in place
  • home care
  • independent living
  • quality of life

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Has consumer-directed care improved the quality of life of older Australians? An exploratory empirical assessment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this