Health inequalities and people with learning disabilities in the UK

Eric Emerson, Susannah Baines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research undertaken in many of the world’s high-income countries has reported that people with learning disabilities have poorer health than their non-disabled peers (Sutherland et al, 2002; Ouellette-Kuntz, 2005; Prasher & Janicki, 2003; Emerson et al, 2009; NHS Health Scotland, 2004; Nocon, 2006; Graham, 2005; Krahn et al, 2006; Elliott et al, 2003; US Department of Health & Human Services, 2002; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk & Walsh, 2008; Turner & Moss, 1966; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, 2005; Kerr, 2004; O’Hara et al, 2010). It is clear that the poorer health of people with learning disabilities is, to an important extent, both avoidable and unjust (Ouellette-Kuntz, 2005; Emerson et al, 2009; Nocon, 2006; Graham, 2005; Krahn et al, 2006; O’Hara et al, 2010). As such, these differences in health status represent a health inequality (The Marmot Review, 2010).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-48
Number of pages7
JournalTizard Learning Disability Review
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

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