High admission rate of infants and young children with whooping cough: clinical aspects and preventive implications

KEVIN FORSYTH, KEITHA FARMER, DIANA R. LENNON

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract Eighty‐five children hospitalized with clinical whooping cough over an 8 month period were studied. Of the 53 cultured for Bordetella pertussis, 29 (55%) were culture positive. There was a preponderance of young infants who required a long hospitalization (35% were less than 3 months of age). Many of these children had apnoeic attacks requiring active intervention. Pulmonary atelectasis‐consolidation was found in 46% in spite of negative viral and bacterial studies. Overcrowding and poor socioeconomic status was noted frequently in those hospitalized. This group makes the least use of child health services, and has the lowest rate of immunizations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-103
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1984
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • apnoea
  • immunization
  • pertussis vaccine
  • whooping cough

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