High Fat Diet Partially Attenuates Fermentation Responses in Rats Fed Resistant Starch From High-Amylose Maize

Jason Charrier, Roy Martin, Kathleen McCutcheon, Anne Raggio, Felicia Goldsmith, Goita M'Famara, Reshani Senevirathne, Ian Brown, Christine Pelkman, June Zhou, John Finley, Holiday Durham, Michael Keenan

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    Abstract

    Objective The effects of type 2 resistant starch from high-amylose maize (HAM-RS2) in rodents fed with low-fat diets were demonstrated in previous studies. Fish oil is also reported to reduce body fat. In the current study, the effects of high fat and fish oil on HAM-RS2 feeding in rats were investigated. Design and Methods Rats were fed 0 or 27% (weight) HAM-RS2 with low (15% energy) or high fat (42% energy) diets that included 0 or 10% (energy) tuna oil to test the effect of HAM-RS2 in diet-induced obesity and effects of tuna oil. Data were analyzed as 2 × 2 × 2 factorial. Results Rats fed HAM-RS2 had decreased cecal contents pH, increased cecal and cecal contents weight, increased cecal contents acetate, propionate, and butyrate, increased GLP-1 and PYY, and decreased abdominal fat. However, high fat partially attenuated effects of HAM-RS2, but increased GLP-1 active. Dietary tuna oil had limited effects at concentration used. Conclusions Results demonstrated that a high fat diet partially attenuates the response to HAM-RS2. The mechanism may center on reduced levels of cecal contents propionate and butyrate and reduced serum PYY. This study demonstrated that with consumption of high fat, HAM-RS2 produces fermentation but results in partial attenuation of effects.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2350-2355
    Number of pages6
    JournalObesity
    Volume21
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    Charrier, J., Martin, R., McCutcheon, K., Raggio, A., Goldsmith, F., M'Famara, G., Senevirathne, R., Brown, I., Pelkman, C., Zhou, J., Finley, J., Durham, H., & Keenan, M. (2013). High Fat Diet Partially Attenuates Fermentation Responses in Rats Fed Resistant Starch From High-Amylose Maize. Obesity, 21(11), 2350-2355. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.20362