Higher levels of greenness and biodiversity associate with greater subjective wellbeing in adults living in Melbourne, Australia

Suzanne Mavoa, Melanie Davern, Martin F. Breed, Amy Hahs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural environments may be important for subjective wellbeing, yet evidence is sparse and measures of nature are unspecific. We used linear regression models to investigate the relationship between greenness, biodiversity and blue space and subjective wellbeing in 4,912 adults living in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Greenness (overall, private and public) and biodiversity associated with subjective wellbeing. In particular, we highlight the importance of the private greenness-subjective wellbeing association. Our work has implications for urban policy and planning in the context of increased urban densification.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-329
Number of pages9
JournalHealth and Place
Volume57
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Blue space
  • Greenness
  • Private greenness
  • Public greenness
  • Subjective wellbeing

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