Higher-order motion sensitivity in fly visual circuits

Yu-Jen Lee, Karin Nordstrom

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    17 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In higher-order motion stimuli, the direction of object motion does not follow the direction of luminance change. Such stimuli could be generated by the wing movements of a flying butterfly and further complicated by its motion in and out of shadows. Human subjects readily perceive the direction of higher-order motion, although this stands in stark contrast to prevailing motion vision models. Flies and humans compute motion in similar ways, and because flies behaviorally track bars containing higher-order motion cues, they become an attractive model system for investigating the neurophysiology underlying higher-order motion sensitivity. We here use intracellular electrophysiology of motion-vision-sensitive neurons in the hoverfly lobula plate to quantify responses to stimuli containing higher-order motion. We show that motion sensitivity can be broken down into two separate streams, directionally coding for elementary motion and figure motion, respectively, and that responses to Fourier and theta motion can be predicted from these. The sensitivity is affected both by the stimulus' time course and by the neuron's underlying receptive field. Responses to preferred-direction theta motion are sexually dimorphic and particularly robust along the visual midline.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)8758-8763
    Number of pages6
    JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
    Volume109
    Issue number22
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 29 May 2012

    Keywords

    • Bar motion
    • Elementary motion detector
    • Neural delays
    • Sexual dimorphism

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Higher-order motion sensitivity in fly visual circuits'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this