Hospitalised injury among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011–12 to 2015–16

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

    Abstract

    Indigenous people were hospitalised as a result of an injury at an average of 23,000 cases per year over the 5-year period 2011–12 to 2015–16. Rates of injury were much higher overall among Indigenous Australians (3,596 per 100,000 population) compared to non-Indigenous Australians (1,874 per 100,000 population) and the rate of injury among Indigenous females was twice that of non-Indigenous females.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationCanberra
    PublisherAustralian Institute of Health and Welfare
    Number of pages105
    ISBN (Electronic)978-1-76054-492-8
    ISBN (Print)978-1-76054-493-5
    Publication statusPublished - 21 Feb 2019

    Publication series

    NameInjury research and statistics
    No.118
    ISSN (Print)1444-3791
    ISSN (Electronic)2205-510X

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    Keywords

    • Indigenous hospitalisations
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander Australians
    • injury rates
    • hospitalised injury

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