Hotspots of corruption: applying a problem-oriented policing approach to preventing corruption in the public sector

Louise Porter, Adam Graycar

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Some places have no crime and some have a lot, and thus we study hotspots. Corruption is structured differently to crime, but hotspots still are notable. The difference is that hotspots are not places but clusters of activity. This article analyses corruption cases from New York City to explore a way of identifying such clusters. Seventy-two cases were coded according to features that represent the elements of the crime triangle: offender and motivation, target and opportunity, and place and ability. Multidimensional scaling revealed three groups of cases, exhibiting different patterns of corrupt activity. Group one involved politicians involved in high value financial corruption. Group two primarily involved supervisors who created opportunities involving procurement and contracts. Group three involved inspectors, particularly in the infrastructure sector, who were involved with low value bribes to violate regulations. Each is discussed in relation to situational crime prevention principles to develop possible strategies for prevention.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)423-441
    Number of pages19
    JournalSecurity Journal
    Volume29
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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