How do you make it to the top? An examination of influences on women's and men's managerial advancement

Phyllis Tharenou, Shane Latimer, Denise Conroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Confirmatory modeling was used to test models of situational and individual influences on women's and men's managerial advancement. Although an overall model fitted the data well, separate models for women and men were more explanatory. Training led to managerial advancement and was of more advantage to men than to women. Work experience and educationcreased training, again more for men than for women. A spouse and dependents at home reduced women's work experience but increased men's, with subsequent effects on training and thus advancement. Finally, career encouragement had a more positive effect on training for women than for men. The study employed 531 women and 501 men who were managers in public and private sector Australian organizations and occupied 6 managerial levels.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)899-931
Number of pages33
JournalAcademy of Management Journal
Volume37
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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