How older people cope with frailty within the context of transition care in Australia: implications for improving service delivery

Ruth Walker, Julie Johns, Dianne Halliday

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Transition care is increasingly common for older people, yet little is known about the subjective experience of the transition care 'journey' from the perspective of clients themselves. This study examines how older people cope with frailty within the context of a dedicated transition care programme and discusses implications for improving service delivery. Qualitative in-depth interviews were carried out during 2011 in the homes of 20 older people who had recently been discharged from a transition care programme operating in Adelaide, South Australia (average age 80 years, 65% female). Thematic analysis identified three key themes: 'a new definition of recovery', 'complexities of control' and 'the disempowering system'. Despite describing many positive aspects of the programme, including meeting personal milestones and a renewed sense of independence, participants recognised that they were unlikely to regain their previous level of functioning. For some, this was exacerbated by lacking control over the transition care process while adapting to their new level of frailty. Overall, this research highlighted that benefits associated with transition care can be undermined by fragmentation in service delivery, loss of control and uncertainties around future support.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)216-224
    Number of pages9
    JournalHealth and Social Care in The Community
    Volume23
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2015

    Keywords

    • Continuum of care
    • Frailty
    • Older people
    • Qualitative research
    • Rehabilitation
    • Transition care

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