How social accountability can be incorporated into an urban community-based medical education program: An Australian initiative

Sarah Mahoney, Linnea Boileau, John Floridis, Christine Abi-Abdallah, Guo Lee

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Medical schools play a role in ensuring that their outcomes ultimately have positive effects on the health status of communities. We describe an initiative that translates this broad intent into meaningful activities that foster positive attitudes to social accountability among medical students in the context of an already full curriculum.

    Methods: Faculty members from an urban community-based medical education program undertook broad consultation with its community groups. Medical students then undertook activities designed to assist in the well-being of socio-economically disadvantaged adolescents through near-peer counselling and health education.

    Results: Early evaluation from medical students, secondary students, community organisations and faculty indicates that the activities undertaken to-date have been of value to stakeholders.

    Discussion: This initiative is intended to develop one model for incorporating social accountability into the medical curriculum with sustainable activities that benefit the community and medical students. Further research and evaluation of the impact of this initiative on both the community group involved and on medical students is essential.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)148-151
    Number of pages4
    JournalEducation For Health: Change in Learning and Practice
    Volume27
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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