How Ukraine’s personal, grassroots memorials honour individual citizens who fought for their nation

Claire Smith, Anna Glew

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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Abstract

It is doubtful Vladimir Putin has visited the memorials along the Alley of the Heavenly Hundred Heroes in central Kyiv. If he had, he might not have underestimated the will of ordinary Ukrainian people to fight – and die – for their country’s independence and their right to determine its future. It is doubtful Vladimir Putin has visited the memorials along the Alley of the Heavenly Hundred Heroes in central Kyiv. Ukrainian memorials built over the last decade have been designed to bring attention to suppressed national memories, and to strengthen Ukrainian identity. Many of these were built out of grassroots initiatives, commemorating those who fell in the Russia-Ukraine conflict. President Zelenskyy’s message throughout the war has been about the ability and willingness of Ukrainians to defend their country. When we look at symbols like the Alley of the Heavenly Hundred Heroes, we understand the valour of ordinary citizens is at the heart of Ukrainian national character.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages5
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 22 May 2022

Keywords

  • memorials
  • Ukraine
  • Russian invasion of Ukraine
  • cultural heritage

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