How venom from the magnificent sea anemone, Heteractis magnifica, kills breast and lung cancer cells

Barbara Sanderson, Karen Burke Da Silva, Mahnaz Ramezanpour

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The sea anemone Heteractis magnifica, also known as the “magnificent one”, is a friendly host to anemonefish. However, it has venom which acts as a chemical defence against predators that helps it to acquire prey in the marine environment. Heteractis magnifica produces venom with multiple biological activities. We have shown killing activity against human lung and breast cancer cells that was concentration-dependent (5-40 µg/ml). The mechanism of cancer cell killing by the venom was also uncovered. Apoptosis (programmed cell death) resistance is a hallmark of cancer. Heteractis magnifica venom induces apoptosis in human lung and breast cancer cell lines. Apoptosis occurs via two pathways and the investigation of these pathways has been discovered. Another hallmark of cancer is cell cycle deregulation, and H. magnifica venom was shown to modulate cell cycle progression in the cancer cell lines mentioned above. Thus the types and levels of breast and lung cancer cell killing by venom from the “Magnificent” sea anemone is explored as well as the mechanistic pathways underlying those effects.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Cnidaria, Past, Present and Future: The World of Medusa and her Sisters
    Subtitle of host publicationThe World of Medusa and her Sisters
    PublisherSpringer
    Pages669-681
    Number of pages13
    Volume41
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Electronic)9783319313054
    ISBN (Print)9783319313030
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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