Hyperspectral and Physiological Analyses of Coral-Algal Interactions

Katie Barott, Jennifer Smith, Elizabeth Dinsdale, Mark Hatay, Stuart Sandin, Forest Rohwer

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69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Space limitation leads to competition between benthic, sessile organisms on coral reefs. As a primary example, reef-building corals are in direct contact with each other and many different species and functional groups of algae. Here we characterize interactions between three coral genera and three algal functional groups using a combination of hyperspectral imaging and oxygen microprofiling. We also performed in situ interaction transects to quantify the relative occurrence of these interaction on coral reefs. These studies were conducted in the Southern Line Islands, home to some of the most remote and near-pristine reefs in the world. Our goal was to determine if different types of coral-coral and coral-algal interactions were characterized by unique fine-scale physiological signatures. This is the first report using hyperspectral imaging for characterization of marine benthic organisms at the micron scale and proved to be a valuable tool for discriminating among different photosynthetic organisms. Consistent patterns emerged in physiology across different types of competitive interactions. In cases where corals were in direct contact with turf or macroalgae, there was a zone of hypoxia and altered pigmentation on the coral. In contrast, interaction zones between corals and crustose coralline algae (CCA) were not hypoxic and the coral tissue was consistent across the colony. Our results suggest that at least two main characteristic coral interaction phenotypes exist: 1) hypoxia and coral tissue disruption, seen with interactions between corals and fleshy turf and/or some species of macroalgae, and 2) no hypoxia or tissue disruption, seen with interactions between corals and some species of CCA. Hyperspectral imaging in combination with oxygen profiling provided useful information on competitive interactions between benthic reef organisms, and demonstrated that some turf and fleshy macroalgae can be a constant source of stress for corals, while CCA are not.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0008043
JournalPLoS One
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

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    Barott, K., Smith, J., Dinsdale, E., Hatay, M., Sandin, S., & Rohwer, F. (2009). Hyperspectral and Physiological Analyses of Coral-Algal Interactions. PLoS One, 4(11), [e0008043]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0008043