'I have now had a look at the Land of "Cousin Jacks" and Pasties': Cornish Australians in Cornwall during the Great War

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 1927, in an article on Cornish emigration in Cornwall County Council's celebratory Cornwall Education Week Handbook, edited by Q (Arthur
Quiller Couch), Harry Pascoe mused on the enduring links between Cornwall and Australia. Almost a decade since the end of hostilities, he looked back nostalgically to the sometimes bitter-sweet atmosphere of those days, recalling the Great War years 'when scores of Australian khaki clad soldiers sought out remote comers of the County to visit for the first and last time the homes of their fathers'. For Australians on the Western Front, there was little hope of returning home half-a-world away while hostilities lasted, unless they were one of the lucky few to be granted an extended furlough or were repatriated as invalids no longer fit for service. In such circumstances, Britain -'Blighty' -assumed great significance as a home-from-home.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCornwall and the Great War
Subtitle of host publicationPerspectives on Conflict and Place
EditorsGarry Tregidga, Thomas Fidler
Place of PublicationPenryn, Cornwall
PublisherInstitute of Cornish Studies
Pages32-42
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781791596019
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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  • Cite this

    Payton, P. (2018). 'I have now had a look at the Land of "Cousin Jacks" and Pasties': Cornish Australians in Cornwall during the Great War. In G. Tregidga, & T. Fidler (Eds.), Cornwall and the Great War: Perspectives on Conflict and Place (pp. 32-42). Institute of Cornish Studies.