'I mean I expect that it's pretty safe': Perceptions of food trust in pregnancy - implications for primary health care practice

Elizabeth Withall, John Coveney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Pregnancy is a time in which food choice is of particular importance. Trust in the food supply and those who regulate it is receiving greater acknowledgement because of the influence of trust on food choice. No prior investigation into pregnant women and food trust has been conducted. Aims This paper identifies factors that determine the nature and extent of pregnant women's trust in food; sources of information which influence pregnant women's food choices; and how trust impacts on pregnant women's food choices. Method In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 pregnant women; nine were pregnant with their first child and four were in their second or subsequent pregnancy. Results Food choices of pregnant women were predominantly influenced by nutrition and perceived quality of food. Risktaking behaviour, such as the consumption of foods considered high risk during pregnancy, was common amongst participants. The sample was characterised by a dependence on expert information, limited reflexivity in relation to food safety, and contradictory practice such as risk-taking behaviours in regard to high risk foods were observed. Conclusion Further research is needed to confirm findings in this study. Research into consumption of high-risk foods and the information received from healthcare providers would be useful in creating a clearer understanding of whether provision of information is sufficient in communicating risks and promoting a healthy pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)358-366
Number of pages9
JournalAustralasian Medical Journal
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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