'I think, you think': Understanding the importance of self-reflection to the taking of another person's perspective

Adam Gerace, Andrew Day, Sharon Casey, Philip Mohr

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article reviews current knowledge about how the tendency to reflect on personal experience is related to the tendency to take another's perspective. While it is well established that self-reflection leads to a greater understanding of one's own emotions, cognitions, and behaviours, the extent to which it is associated with understanding others is less well understood, despite the implications of this for the development of more effective interventions to improve empathy. The types of self-reflection that are used in clinical and psychotherapeutic interventions are used to illustrate the possibilities here, and ways in which clinicians may increase their own self-reflection are also considered.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)Art: e9
    Number of pages19
    JournalJournal of Relationships Research
    Volume8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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