'Imagine if I gave up smoking ...': a qualitative exploration of Aboriginal participants' perspectives of a self-management pilot training intervention

Kimberley Chapple, Ingeborg Kowanko, Peter Harvey, Alwin Chong, Malcolm Battersby

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This paper reports on a pilot qualitative study investigating Aboriginal participants' perspectives of the Flinders Living Well Smoke Free (LWSF) 'training intervention'. Health workers nationally have been trained in this program, which offers a self-management approach to reducing smoking among Aboriginal clients. A component of the training involves Aboriginal clients volunteering their time in a mock care-planning session providing the health workers with an opportunity to practise their newly acquired skills. During this simulation, the volunteer clients receive one condensed session of the LWSF intervention imitating how the training will be implemented when the health workers have completed the training. For the purpose of this study, 10 Aboriginal clients who had been volunteers in the mock care-planning process, underwent a semi-structured interview at seven sites in Australia, including mainstream health services, Aboriginal community controlled health services and remote Aboriginal communities. The study aimed to gauge their perspectives of the training intervention they experienced. Early indications suggest that Aboriginal volunteer clients responded positively to the process, with many reporting substantial health behaviour change or plans to make changes since taking part in this mock care-planning exercise. Enablers of the intervention are discussed along with factors to be considered in the training program.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)147-152
    Number of pages6
    JournalAustralian Journal of Primary Health
    Volume22
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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