'In my Memory, it says Rarawa’: Abandoned Vessel Material Salvage and Reuse at Rangitoto Island, Aotearoa / New Zealand

Kurt Bennett, Madeline Fowler

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Together, archaeological evidence and oral histories better inform our understanding of the interaction between abandoned vessel sites and communities. While the maritime and historic archaeological record can reveal salvage and reuse activities, material culture does not always reflect a direct link between the two. In this study of abandoned vessel material salvage and reuse at Rangitoto Island, Aotearoa / New Zealand, oral histories collected from the owners of baches—small and modest holiday homes—serve as a linkage tool that tie the two together. Furthermore, the archaeological and historical significance of this tangible and intangible cultural heritage serves to foreground the Rangitoto Island community’s current struggle to have this legacy recognised.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)27-48
    Number of pages22
    JournalInternational Journal of Historical Archaeology
    Volume21
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2016

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