Incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years and risk factors of cancer in Australia and comparison with OECD countries, 1990–2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

Yohannes Adama Melaku, Sarah L. Appleton, Tiffany K. Gill, Felix A. Ogbo, Elizabeth Buckley, Zumin Shi, Tim Driscoll, Robert Adams, Benjamin C. Cowie, Christina Fitzmaurice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Comparative evidence on the burden, trend, and risk factors of cancer is limited. Using data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study, we aimed to assess cancer burden – incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) – and attributable risk factors for Australia between 1990 and 2015, and to compare them with those of 34 members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Methods The general GBD cancer estimation methods were used with data input from vital registration systems and cancer registries. A comparative risk assessment approach was used to estimate the population-attributable fractions due to risk factors. Results In 2015 there were 198,880 (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 183,908–217,365) estimated incident cancer cases and 47,562 (95% UI: 46,061–49,004) cancer deaths in Australia. Twenty-nine percent (95% UI: 28.2–29.8) of total deaths and 17.0% (95% UI: 15.0–19.1) of DALYs were caused by cancer in Australia in 2015. Cancers of the trachea, bronchus and lung, colon and rectum, and prostate were the most common causes of cancer deaths. Thirty-six percent (95% UI: 33.1–37.9) of all cancer deaths were attributable to behavioral risks. The age-standardized cancer incidence rate (ASIR) increased between 1990 and 2015, while the age-standardized cancer death rate (ASDR) decreased over the same period. In 2015, compared to 34 other OECD countries Australia ranked first (highest) and 24th based on ASIR and ASDR, respectively. Conclusion The incidence of cancer has increased over 25 years, and behavioral risks are responsible for a large proportion of cancer deaths. Scaling up of prevention (using strategies targeting cancer risk factors), early detection, and treatment of cancer is required to effectively address this growing health challenge.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-54
Number of pages12
JournalCancer Epidemiology
Volume52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Burden of cancer
  • Burden of disease
  • Cancer
  • Cancer risk factors
  • Oecd

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