Incomplete control of obstructive sleep apnoea with continuous positive airway pressure therapy: Time for a personalized therapy approach?

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

    Abstract

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy has been the gold standard therapy for moderate‐to‐severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) for several decades.1 Therapeutic success for CPAP therapy is generally defined as a reduction in the apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) to below 5 events/h with concurrent improvement in symptoms (including daytime sleepiness, snoring and quality of life) and satisfactory long‐term adherence. This is achievable in many patients, yet approximately 50% of patients either refuse CPAP therapy or are non‐adherent.2 Others are compliant with therapy but persistently demonstrate a residual AHI ≥5 events/h indicating suboptimal control. To date, there has been limited epidemiological or mechanistic research regarding patients with a residual AHI ≥5 events/h on CPAP therapy.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)51-52
    Number of pages2
    JournalRespirology
    Volume25
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

    Keywords

    • continuous positive airway pressure
    • residual apnoeic events
    • sleep apnoea

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