Increased Psychosocial Stress in Greek-Born Immigrants Compared to Anglo-Australians with Coronary Heart Disease: The Healthy Heart, Healthy Mind Study

Litza Kiropoulos, Ian Meredith, Andrew Tonkin, David Clarke, P Antonis, Julie Plunkett

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To compare measures of depression and anxiety, physical health status, quality of life, and social support in Greek-born and Anglo-Australian outpatients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: A cross-sectional study of 61 Greek-born immigrants and 62 Anglo-Australian outpatients with CHD recruited between 2009 and 2011 was undertaken. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory-2 and the Cardiac Depression Scale, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the SF-12, the World Health Organisation Quality of Life (brief version), and the Perceived Social Support Scale and Social Enriched Social Support Instrument. Results: Compared to Anglo-Australians, the Greek-born immigrants had higher depression and anxiety scores, lower reported physical health status, lower perceived social support and lower quality of life on the physical, psychological and environmental health subdomains (p values < .05). Birthplace differences remained for level of depression and anxiety when adjustments were made for other CHD risk factors. Conclusion: Greek-born immigrants were found to have more psychosocial risk factors for CHD compared to the Anglo-Australians. We suggest that differences in depression and anxiety may help explain differences in CHD risk and morbidity between Greek-born immigrants and other ethnic groups living in Australia.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)794-802
    Number of pages9
    JournalHeart, Lung and Circulation
    Volume21
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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