Indigenous peoples' health care: new approaches to contracting and accountability at the public administration frontier

Judith Dwyer, Amohia Boulton, A/Professor Lavoie, Tim Tenbensel, Jackie Cumming

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    17 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Abstract: This article analyses reforms to contracting and accountability for indigenous primary health care organizations in Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. The reforms are presented as comparative case studies, the common reform features identified and their implications analysed.

    The reforms share important characteristics. Each proceeds from implicit recognition that indigenous organizations are ‘co-principals’ rather than simply agents in their relationship with government funders and regulators. There is a common tendency towards more relational forms of contracting; and tentative attempts to reconceptualize accountability. These ‘frontier’ cases have broad implications for social service contracting.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1091-1112
    Number of pages22
    JournalPublic Management Review
    Volume16
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2013

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