Indigenous Peoples’ perspectives of living with chronic kidney disease: systematic review of qualitative studies

Marianne Kerr, Nicole Evangelidis, Penelope Abbott, Jonathan C. Craig, Michelle Dickson, Nicole Scholes-Robertson, Victoria Sinka, Rahim T. Vastani, Katherine Widders, Jacqueline H. Stephens, Allison Jaure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Indigenous Peoples are defined as those who first lived in a region and have distinct cultural traditions, knowledge, and language that provide a basis for positive self-image and healthy identity. Indigenous Peoples have retained much of their cultural identity and displayed remarkable resilience in managing health using holistic approaches, despite being dispossessed of their lands through ongoing colonization that threatens their livelihoods and cultures. Indigenous Peoples are challenged by low health literacy, poor access to health care, lack of cultural safety in mainstream health services, and systemic racism and cultural misunderstanding. Consequently, Indigenous Peoples health is adversely affected, with the prevalence of noncommunicable diseases increasing.

The high burden of chronic disease among Indigenous Peoples is widely recognized, in particular, the high incidence of hypertension and diabetes which increases the risk of developing kidney disease...
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)720-727
Number of pages8
JournalKidney International
Volume102
Issue number4
Early online date2 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Jul 2022

Keywords

  • Indigenous
  • kidney disease
  • outcomes
  • qualitative research

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