Infant sleep during COVID-19: Longitudinal analysis of infants of US mothers in home confinement versus working as usual

Michal Kahn, Natalie Barnett, Assaf Glazer, Michael Gradisar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study longitudinally compared the sleep of infants in the United States whose mothers were in home confinement to those whose mothers were working as usual throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Mothers of 572 infants (46% girls) aged 1-12 months (M = 5.9, standard deviation = 2.9) participated. Assessments were conducted on 4 occasions from late March to May 2020. Infant sleep was measured objectively using auto-videosomnography. Mothers reported their sheltering status, demographic characteristics, and infant sleep. Results: Infants of mothers in home confinement had later sleep offset times and longer nighttime sleep durations, compared to infants of mothers who were working as usual. At the end of March, these infants also had earlier bedtimes, more nighttime awakenings, and more parental nighttime visits, but differences were not apparent during April and May. Conclusions: Living restrictions issued in the United States may have led to longer sleep durations and temporary delays in sleep consolidation for infants of mothers in home confinement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-23
Number of pages5
JournalSleep Health
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Auto-videosomnography
  • COVID-19
  • Home confinement
  • Infant
  • Sleep

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