Integrating smoking cessation care into a medically supervised injecting facility using an organizational change intervention: A qualitative study of staff and client views

Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Anthony Shakeshaft, Ashleigh Guillaumier, William Wood, Marianne Jauncey, Allison M. Salmon, Sam McCrabb, Billie Bonevski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Clients accessing supervised injecting facilities (SIFs) smoke at high rates. An SIF piloted an organizational change intervention to integrate smoking cessation care as routine treatment. This study aims to explore staff acceptability, perceived facilitators, and perceived barriers to implementing six core components of an organizational change intervention to integrate smoking cessation care in an SIF. Staff and client views on the acceptability, facilitators, and barriers to the provision of smoking cessation care were also examined. Methods: This paper presents findings from the qualitative component conducted post-intervention implementation. Face-to-face semi-structured staff interviews (n = 14) and two client focus groups (n = 5 and n = 4) were conducted between September and October 2016. Recruitment continued until data saturation was reached. Thematic analysis was employed to synthesise and combine respondent views and identify key themes. Results: Staff viewed the organizational change intervention as acceptable. Commitment from leadership, a designated champion, access to resources, and the congruence between the change and the facility’s ethos were important facilitators of organizational change. Less engaged staff was the sole barrier to the intervention. Smoking cessation care was deemed suitable. Key facilitators of smoking cessation care included: Written protocols, ongoing training, and visually engaging information. Key barriers of smoking cessation care included: Lack of access to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) outside of business hours, practical limitations of the database, and concerns about sustainability of NRT. Conclusion: This study develops our understanding of factors influencing the implementation of an organisational change intervention to promote sustainable provision of smoking cessation care in the SIF setting.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2050
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acceptability
  • Barriers
  • Facilitators
  • Organizational change
  • Persons who inject drugs
  • Smoking cessation
  • Supervised injecting facility
  • Tobacco smoking

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