Internet gaming disorder should qualify as a mental disorder

Daniel L. King, Paul H. Delfabbro, Marc N. Potenza, Zsolt Demetrovics, Joël Billieux, Matthias Brand

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In their recent ANZJP paper, Dullur and Starcevic (2018) argue that Internet gaming disorder (IGD) should not qualify as a mental disor-der. They base this view on several arguments, including the notion that IGD does not fit the concept of a mental disorder, that IGD would pathologise normal gaming, that the addiction model for gaming is mislead-ing and that a diagnosis is not neces-sary for treatment purposes. In this paper, we provide a critical appraisal of the authors’ points. While there are some aspects of their arguments which we support, there are many with which we disagree. We believe their views would be relevant to other behavioural addictions and would serve to undermine their valid-ity, including with respect to gambling disorder.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-617
Number of pages3
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume52
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • mental disorder
  • internet gaming disorder
  • critical appraisal
  • behavioural addictions

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Internet gaming disorder should qualify as a mental disorder'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    King, D. L., Delfabbro, P. H., Potenza, M. N., Demetrovics, Z., Billieux, J., & Brand, M. (2018). Internet gaming disorder should qualify as a mental disorder. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 52(7), 615-617. https://doi.org/10.1177/0004867418771189