Intrinsic Religiousness as a Mediator Between Fatalism and Cancer-Specific Fear: Clarifying the Role of Fear in Prostate Cancer Screening

L Christman, Alexis Abernethy, R Gorsuch, A Brown

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Understanding factors that influence screening receptivity may enhance African-American men's receptivity to prostate cancer screening. Men of African descent (N = 481) between the ages of 40 and 70 were recruited. The hypotheses that Fatalism would be related to Intrinsic Religiousness and Fear, Intrinsic Religiousness would act as a mediator between Fatalism and Fear, and Fatalism as well as Prostate Cancer-Specific Fear would be negatively related to past Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing and Screening Intent were supported. This meditational finding suggests that when religious beliefs are a motivating force, the fear-inducing effects of fatalism are reduced.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)760-772
    Number of pages13
    JournalJournal of Religion and Health
    Volume53
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2014

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Intrinsic Religiousness as a Mediator Between Fatalism and Cancer-Specific Fear: Clarifying the Role of Fear in Prostate Cancer Screening'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this