Is technology the death of expertise?

Duncan Taylor

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Dear Sir,
    It is with increasing commonality that forensic fields feel the advance of automated technologies; so marked are the abilities of these technologies, in particular in the area of computing, that members of the wider forensic community have begun to question, or more aptly put, accuse, when it suits their goal, whether the addition of these tools lowers the expertise within the field that utilises them. So the question, if reduced to its core, is whether technology has brought scientific expertise to its preagonal state. In a juxtaposition to this problem, seemingly of the modern era, I have recently been reading seminal works of those forefathers of reason and thought, often taking my literary wandering back hundreds of years; it is from these florid and eloquent works that I realise all modern problems tend to possess an ancestral occurrence, the specifics of which change with the context of time, but whose underlying premise remains. Moved by the forms of literature I have read I find it an ironic pleasure to present my thoughts on the seemingly modern issue in seemingly historic prose; is technology the death of expertise?
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)e1-e3
    Number of pages3
    JournalForensic Science International: Genetics
    Volume24
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

    Keywords

    • forensic
    • scientific expertise
    • automated technologies
    • technology
    • computing

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