It’s About Time! Identifying and Explaining Unique Trajectories of Solidarity-Based Collective Action to Support People in Developing Countries

Emma F. Thomas, Craig McGarty, Winnifred R. Louis, Michael Wenzel, Simon Bury, Lydia Woodyatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Social change occurs over years and decades, yet we know little about how people sustain, increase or diminish their actions over time, and why they do so. This article examines diverging trajectories of solidarity-based collective action to support people in developing nations more than 5 years. We suggest that sustained, diminished, and/or increased action over time will be predicted by identification as a supporter, group efficacy beliefs, and discrete emotions about disadvantage. Latent Growth Mixture Models (N = 483) revealed two trajectories with unique signatures: an activist supporter trajectory with a higher intercept and weakly declining action; and a benevolent supporter trajectory with a lower intercept but weakly increasing action. The activist trajectory was predicted by social identification, outrage, and hope, whereas the benevolent supporter trajectory was predicted by sympathy. The results highlight the role of combinations of emotions and the need for person-centered longitudinal methods in collective action research.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Early online date5 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Oct 2021

Keywords

  • collective action
  • efficacy
  • emotion
  • hope
  • outrage
  • social identification
  • trajectories

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