Labelling fashion magazine advertisements: Effectiveness of different label formats on social comparison and body dissatisfaction

Marika Tiggemann, Zoe Brown

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The experiment investigated the impact on women's body dissatisfaction of different forms of label added to fashion magazine advertisements. Participants were 340 female undergraduate students who viewed 15 fashion advertisements containing a thin and attractive model. They were randomly allocated to one of five label conditions: no label, generic disclaimer label (indicating image had been digitally altered), consequence label (indicating that viewing images might make women feel bad about themselves), informational label (indicating the model in the advertisement was underweight), or a graphic label (picture of a paint brush). Although exposure to the fashion advertisements resulted in increased body dissatisfaction, there was no significant effect of label type on body dissatisfaction; no form of label demonstrated any ameliorating effect. In addition, the consequence and informational labels resulted in increased perceived realism and state appearance comparison. Yet more extensive research is required before the effective implementation of any form of label.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)97-102
    Number of pages6
    JournalBody Image
    Volume25
    Early online date8 Mar 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

    Keywords

    • Fashion magazines
    • Social comparison
    • Body dissatisfaction
    • Disclaimer labels
    • Media

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