Latissimus dorsi avulsion, with coupled teres major injury, in a professional football goalkeeper: case report.

Mat Prior, Jason Collins, Richard Pope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Significant upper limb injuries are rare in professional football [soccer]. Latissimus dorsi avulsion injury is particularly rare in sport of all types, with limited published information informing optimal management. A 35 year-old male professional football goalkeeper sustained, via a non-contact ball throwing mechanism, a latissimus dorsi avulsion and partial teres major tendon tear during competitive matchplay. He undertook a conservative rehabilitation programme, emphasising progressive mechanical loading, in order to return to full function and competition. The player successfully returned to unrestricted training at 32 days post-injury and returned to play at 38 days post-injury. At 12 months post-injury he had suffered no injury recurrence and remains playing at the same competition level. Latissimus dorsi avulsion is an uncommon injury, with accurate diagnosis requiring both a high level of clinical suspicion coupled with diagnostic imaging. Despite the severity, this injury may be amenable to conservative management in even elite athletes with high functional demands. The following case outlines such a management approach successfully utilised with a professional football goalkeeper.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-146
Number of pages8
JournalNew Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Rehabilitation
  • Shoulder
  • Soccer
  • Tendon

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Latissimus dorsi avulsion, with coupled teres major injury, in a professional football goalkeeper: case report.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this