Learning to Be Leaders in Higher Education: What Helps or Hinders Women’s Advancement as Leaders in Universities

. Airini, Sunny Collings, Lindsey Conner, Kathryn McPherson, Brenda Midson, Cheryl Wilson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    41 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article examines 110 reported incidents from an online survey of 26 women from each of the eight universities in New Zealand. They responded to questions asking them to describe times when work and non-work situations have helped or hindered their advancement in university leadership roles. Five key themes, incorporating a range of factors, emerged as making a difference to advancement as leaders. These themes are: work relationships; university environment; invisible rules; proactivity; and personal circumstances. This research is part of the L-SHIP (Leadership - Supporting Higher Intent & Practice) project and has two main aims. First, to identify factors in universities that help and hinder women's advancement as leaders, as reported by women; second, to provide useful evidence to underpin the development of programmes supporting women's advancement in university leadership roles. This research is a first step in the development of the L-SHIP Toolkit for good practice in leadership development in higher education.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)44-62
    Number of pages19
    JournalEducational Management, Administration & Leadership
    Volume39
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

    Keywords

    • administration
    • leadership
    • management
    • universities
    • women

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