Leisure as a human right: an exploration of people with disabilities’ perceptions of leisure, arts and recreation participation through Australian Community Access Services

Ted Evans, Michelle Bellon, Brian Matthews

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Community Access Services (CAS) are defined as ‘Services designed to provide opportunities for people with disability to gain and use their abilities to enjoy their full potential for social independence’ [Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. 2015. Disability Services National Minimum Data Set Collection: Data Transmission and Technical Guide. Canberra: AIHW]. A notable absence of international research regarding leisure, arts and recreation through CAS exists. This study explores perceptions of people with disabilities on their participation in leisure, arts and recreation through Australian CAS. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used involving: memoing, observations, focus groups, interviews and questionnaires from people with disabilities and their families (n = 114); and a critical discourse analysis of texts (n = 42). Results revealed seven major themes including: transition to leisure, arts and recreation; individualized services; local accessible services; positive organizational culture; community inclusion; innovation and co-production. These findings may contribute to the transformation of CAS as people with disabilities actively engage as equal partners within leisure, arts and recreation as a human right.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)331-348
    Number of pages18
    JournalAnnals of Leisure Research
    Volume20
    Issue number3
    Early online date2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

    Keywords

    • art
    • co-production
    • day activities
    • disability
    • human rights
    • inclusion
    • Leisure
    • recreation

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