Light transmission patterns in occluded tissue: does rouleaux formation play a role?

Mark McEwen, Karen Reynolds

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is evidence from the literature that suggests erythrocyte rouleaux, seen to form under favourable conditions (such as reduced blood flow) in vitro, may also occur in vivo, leading to a possibility of rouleaux influencing the transmission of light through tissue. This pilot study investigates the transmission of light through occluded tissues of human subjects, horses and sheep with a view to greater understanding of rouleaux formation in vivo, and its effect on light transmission through tissue. The paper supports the evidence that occlusion may cause rouleaux formation in vivo, but the association between rouleaux formation and light transmission changes during occlusion is complex, and occlusion may have effects on light transmission beyond the formation of rouleaux.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages566-571
    Number of pages6
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012
    EventProceedings of the World Congress on Engineering -
    Duration: 4 Jul 2012 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceProceedings of the World Congress on Engineering
    Period4/07/12 → …

    Keywords

    • Light transmission
    • Occlusion
    • Red blood cells
    • Rouleaux

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  • Cite this

    McEwen, M., & Reynolds, K. (2012). Light transmission patterns in occluded tissue: does rouleaux formation play a role?. 566-571. Paper presented at Proceedings of the World Congress on Engineering, .