Low-resolution colonic manometry leads to a gross misinterpretation of the frequency and polarity of propagating sequences: Initial results from fiber-optic high-resolution manometry studies

Philip Dinning, Lukasz Wiklendt, Ian Gibbins, Vicki Patton, Peter Bampton, David Lubowski, Ian Cook, John Arkwright

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    62 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: High-resolution manometry catheters are now being used to record colonic motility. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of pressure sensor spacing on our ability to identify colonic propagating sequences (PS). Methods: Fiber-optic catheters containing 72-90 sensors spaced at 1 cm intervals were placed colonoscopically to the cecum in 11 patients with proven slow transit constipation, 11 patients with neurogenic fecal incontinence and nine healthy subjects. A 2 h section of trace from each subject was analyzed. Using the 1 cm spaced data as the gold standard, each data set was then sub-sampled, by dropping channels from the data set to simulate sensor spacing of 10, 7, 5, 3, and 2 cm. In blinded fashion, antegrade and retrograde PS were quantified at each test sensor spacing. The data were compared to the PSs identified in the corresponding gold standard data set. Key Results: In all subject groups as sensor spacing increased; (i) the frequency of identified antegrade and retrograde PSs decreased (P < 0.0001); (ii) the ratio of antegrade to retrograde PSs increased (P < 0.0001); and (iii) the number of incorrectly labeled PSs increased (P < 0.003). Conclusions & Inferences: Doubling the sensor spacing from 1 to 2 cm nearly halves the number of PSs detected. Tripling the sensor spacing from 1 to 3 cm resulted in a 30% chance of incorrectly labeling PSs. Closely spaced pressure recording sites (<2 cm) are mandatory to avoid gross misrepresentation of the frequency, morphology, and directionality of colonic propagating sequences. This paper provides evidence to support the use of high-resolution manometry for recording human intra-luminal colonic contractions. These data indicate that closely spaced pressure recording sites (<2cm) are mandatory to avoid gross misrepresentation of the frequency, morphology and directionality of colonic propagating sequences.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)e640-e649
    Number of pages10
    JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
    Volume25
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2013

    Keywords

    • Colon
    • Fiber-optic manomerty
    • High-resolution
    • Propagating pressure waves

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