Management and treatment efficacy of drug and alcohol problems: what do doctors believe?

ANN M. ROCHE, MICHAEL D. PARLE, JOANNE M. STUBBS, WAYNE HALL, JOHN B. SAUNDERS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract


We conducted a survey of the attitudes of postgraduate medical trainees in Australia on the management of drug and alcohol problems and examined the medical practitioner's role in managing drug and alcohol problems, factors influencing prognosis and beliefs about the efficacy of a number of treatment interventions. Of 2461 trainees enrolled in specially training programmes in internal medicine, psychiatry and general practice 1361 (55%) participated. There was a high level of acceptance of responsibility for management of alcohol and drug problems, with the strongest support observed among psychiatry trainees. However, views of the efficacy of various treatment interventions were less positive. Alcoholics Anonymous was considered to be an approach well supported by the research literature. Dynamic psychotherapy was less well supported, and there was considerable uncertainty about the evidence for brief advice and cognitive‐behaviour therapies. The opinions expressed on treatment efficacy were in many cases in striking contrast to the research evidence. The implications for future training in drugs and alcohol in specialty programmes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1357-1366
Number of pages10
JournalAddiction
Volume90
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1995
Externally publishedYes

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