Management of older adults with hip fractures in India: a mixed methods study of current practice, barriers and facilitators, with recommendations to improve care pathways

Santosh Rath , Lalit Yadav, Abha Tewari, Tracey Chantler , Mark Woodward, Prakash Kotwal , Anil Jain , Aparajit Dey, Bhavuk Garg , Rajesh Malhotra , Ashish Goel , Kamran Farooque, Vijay Sharma , Premila Webster, Robyn Norton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: Evidence-based management can reduce deaths and suffering of older adults with hip fractures. This study investigates the evidence-practice gaps in hip fracture care in three major hospitals in Delhi, potential barriers and facilitators to improving care, and consequently, identifies contextually appropriate interventions for implementing best practice for management of older adults with hip fractures in India. Purpose: Hip fracture in older adults is a significant public health issue in India. The current study sought to document current practices, identify barriers and facilitators to adopting best practice guidelines and recommend improvements in the management of older adults with hip fractures in Delhi, India. Methods: This mixed methods observational study collected data from healthcare providers, patients, carers and medical records from three major public tertiary care hospitals in Delhi, India. All patients aged ≥50 years with an X-ray confirmed hip fracture that were admitted to these hospitals over a 10-week period were recruited. Patients’ data were collected at admission, discharge and 30 days post-injury. Eleven key informant interviews and four focus group discussions were conducted with healthcare providers. Descriptive data for key quantitative variables were computed. The qualitative data were analysed and interpreted using a behaviour change wheel framework. Results: A total of 136 patients, 74 (54%) men and 62 women, with hip fracture were identified in the three participating hospitals during the recruitment period and only 85 (63%) were admitted for treatment with a mean age of 66.5 years (SD 11.9). Of these, 30% received surgery within 48 h of hospital admission, 95% received surgery within 39 days of hospital admission and two (3%) had died by 30 days of injury. According to the healthcare providers, inadequate resources and overcrowding prevent adequate caring of the hip fracture patients. They unanimously felt the need for protocol-based management of hip fracture in India. Conclusion: The development and implementation of national guidelines and standardized protocols of care for older people with hip fractures in India has the potential to improve both care and patient-related outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number55
Number of pages13
JournalArchives of Osteoporosis
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jun 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Care pathways
  • Fragility fracture
  • Hip fracture
  • India
  • Mixed methods

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Management of older adults with hip fractures in India: a mixed methods study of current practice, barriers and facilitators, with recommendations to improve care pathways'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this