Marine, Maritime, or Submerged Prehistory? Contextualizing the Prehistoric Underwater Archaeologies of Inland, Coastal, and Offshore Environments

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    Abstract

    Studies in submerged prehistoric archaeology have gained momentum in recent years with particular focus on the inundated landscapes of the European continental shelf. Although this renewed interest lies primarily in modern coasts and seas, there are a variety of differences between the submerged prehistoric archaeologies of inland and marine environments, ranging from questions of scientific research to heritage management to practical field methods. Some of these differences are the result of location, function, and period. Despite this, there exist similarities that, if ignored, risk increased marginalization of the archaeology of submerged landscapes from the greater field of prehistoric archaeology. A holistic evaluation of prehistoric archaeological landscapes must include inland waters and coastal zones and their relationships. Aquatic environments, viewed both as individual locations as well as continuous and connecting waterways, are introduced for their differences and similarities, and simplified examples of material and legislation are introduced in order to contextualize submarine sites and practices within the greater fields of prehistory and underwater archaeology.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)237-256
    Number of pages20
    JournalEuropean Journal of Archaeology
    Volume15
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

    Keywords

    • Britain
    • Coastal
    • Estuarine
    • Lacustrine
    • Prehistory
    • Riverine
    • Scotland
    • Underwater archaeology

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