Marking a marginal past: Schooling and dispossession in the Franklin Harbour district

Kaylene Whitehead, Benjamin Wadham

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this paper we review the colonisation of the Franklin Harbour district in South Australia from the 1850s, focusing on public education and social memory. In the late nineteenth century schooling was entirely in women’s hands. Women teachers, notably the McEwen sisters, were important contributors to the district educationally, socially and economically. However, women’s and Aboriginal histories are marginalised in the district’s social memory. Women teachers barely register and the fraught relationships between the Barngarla people and white settlers are subordinated to a white masculinist narrative of progress. This article has been peer-reviewed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)25-46
    Number of pages22
    JournalHistory Australia: Journal of The Australian Historical Association
    Volume8
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Marking a marginal past: Schooling and dispossession in the Franklin Harbour district'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this