Maternal immunization with adjuvanted RSV prefusion F protein effectively protects offspring from RSV challenge and alters innate and T cell immunity

Katherine M. Eichinger, Jessica L. Kosanovich, Madeline A. Lipp, Timothy N. Perkins, Nikolai Petrovsky, Christopher Marshall, Mark A. Yondola, Kerry M. Empey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) commonly causes severe respiratory tract infections in infants, peaking between 2 and 6 months of age; an age at which direct vaccination is unlikely to be effective. Maternal immunization can deliver high levels of antibodies to newborns, providing immediate protection. Following natural infection, antibodies targeting the prefusion conformation of RSV F protein (PreF) have the greatest neutralizing capacity and thus, may provide infants with a high degree of RSV protection when acquired through maternal vaccination. However, the influence of anti-PreF maternal antibodies on infant immunity following RSV exposure has not been elucidated. To address this knowledge gap, offspring born to dams immunized with a RSV PreF vaccine formulation were challenged with RSV and their immune responses were analyzed over time. These studies demonstrated safety and efficacy for RSV-challenged, maternally-immunized offspring but high and waning maternal antibody levels were associated with differential innate and T cell immunity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7885-7891
Number of pages7
JournalVaccine
Volume38
Issue number50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Antibody
  • Immunity
  • Infant
  • Maternal
  • Offspring
  • PreF
  • RSV

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