Mediated and direct effects of general control beliefs on obsessive compulsive symptoms

Richard Moulding, Michael Kyrios, Guy Doron, Maja Nedeljkovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although control-related cognitions have often been implicated in discussions of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), empirical investigations of the relationship between control constructs and OCD symptoms have been relatively limited. This article investigated the hypothesis that OCD symptoms may be linked with a higher desire for control (DC), but a lower sense of control (SC) over the self and environment, leading to motivation for compulsive symptoms. It also investigated whether this effect was direct, or mediated through other OCD-related cognitions. This hypothesis was investigated in a nonclinical population, using path analyses controlling for depression. It was found that higher levels of DC and lower levels of SC were associated with higher levels of OCD-related beliefs, and with symptoms via higher OCD-related beliefs. SC was also directly linked with higher OCD symptoms. Control beliefs regarding both the internal (emotions) and external (threat) environment were related to OCD symptoms. Implications for therapy and research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-92
Number of pages9
JournalCANADIAN JOURNAL OF BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE-REVUE CANADIENNE DES SCIENCES DU COMPORTEMENT
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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